Information for Preceptors

How can I become a preceptor and help to eliminate the internship shortage?

On occasion, students may contact you to see if you are willing to precept them. If so, ask for the name of the program and information about the program's expectations. Whether you are a new or well-established preceptor, you should go through preceptor training provided by the program to make sure that you can fulfill the specific requirements of the program such as:

  • Teaching and modeling knowledge, skills, professional values, and behaviors needed for students to successfully complete practitioner competencies
  • Instilling the need in interns or students for patient advocacy, lifelong learning, evidence-based practice and giving back to the profession
  • Supervising the practice abilities of the intern or student on a regular basis
  • Evaluating the intern or student, providing feedback for improvement and documenting her/his progress
  • Providing feedback to the program on the effectiveness of the education experience for continuous quality improvement
  • Notifying the program if you become unable to precept interns or students
  • Demonstrating no bias or conflict of interest in the education of interns or students
  • Upholding the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Code of Ethics 

Dietitian Job Outlook

Employment of dietitians and nutritionists is projected to grow 11 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations. In recent years, interest in the role of food and nutrition in promoting health and wellness has increased, particularly as a part of preventative healthcare in medical settings.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults are obese. Many diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, are associated with obesity. The importance of diet in preventing and treating illnesses is now well known. More dietitians and nutritionists will be needed to provide care for people with these conditions.