Core Curriculum

Mission Seminar Section Descriptions Spring 2018

all VUSM sections only.  Additional Living in a Diverse World and Serving the Common Good courses may be available.  For more information, consult the searchable VU catalog.

Mission Seminar Section Descriptions, Spring 2018

The descriptions for currently scheduled can be found below may provide more detail than those found in the printed catalog but are subject to change. Standard descriptions of VUSM courses can also be found in the searchable VU catalog.

 

Mission Seminars:  Franciscan Values and Traditions

VUSM-100-001 MWF 8:00am-8:55am MRC 348 Jean M. Moore

Franciscan Values and Traditions

Viterbo University was founded in 1890 by the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. This entry-level course examines that heritage and what it means to be and behave like a Franciscan. These courses will use the works of Saints Francis, Clare, and Rose of Viterbo as a foundation for exploring the university's core values of hospitality, integrity, contemplation, stewardship and service. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 100 level.

 

VUSM-100-002 TR 9:30am-10:50am MRC 378 Jackie Herbers

Franciscan Arguments

St Francis once said, “Preach always; if necessary, use words.” Here, St. Francis conveys his message that it is better for Christians to show their faith through serving others than to just speak of their faith.  In Franciscan Arguments, students will consider the question, “What are the values shown in society today?” by using rhetorical approaches to critically analyze a variety of artifacts.  These artifacts include, but are not limited to, speeches, articles, web sites, advertisements and songs.  After analyzing these artifacts, students will decide for themselves which values they see and will compare those to the values St. Francis tried to live.  Finally, students will argue what they see as positive values in our society and what values they would like to see change.  Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 100 level.

 

VUSM 100-004 MW 3:35pm-4:55pm MRC 436 Keith Knutson

 Franciscan Values and Traditions

In 1980, Umberto Eco, a professor at the University of Bologna, Italy, published a famous novel entitled The Name of the Rose. Although the setting is a Benedictine monastery in northern Italy during the early 14th century, the novel’s hero is a Franciscan friar. Eco is very good in translating the dynamism of medieval religious movements into modern terms.

The aim of this course is to understand the sociological, economic, even political foundations that drove the Franciscan reform movement. But also, why did the Franciscans become involved in such turmoil as our novel describes?  The reading and discussion of the novel, and the study of the characters in the motion picture made from the novel, starring Sean Connery as the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville.  Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 100 level.

 

VUSM 101-001 TR 11:00am-12:20pm BRC 207 Lawrence Janowski

Leading by Serving

This seminar is designed for the active student learner. Students will learn the principles of Servant Leadership, examine Franciscan, values and participate in a variety of leadership experiences which build a foundation for leadership in any career.  Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 100 level.

 

VUSM 110 MWF 12:20pm – 1:15pm MRC 348 Laura Nettles

Relationships, Health and Well-Being

Using the stories of Francis, Clare, and Rose as a lens to reflect on contemporary and personal narratives, this seminar examines Franciscan values and traditions as they relate to relationships and health and well-being. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 100 level.

 

Mission Seminars: Living in a Diverse World

VUSM-200-001 T 5:00pm - 8:00pm NRC 205 Jeff Nyseth

Living in a Diverse World

“Our species exhibits considerable diversity; diversity in physical appearance, in beliefs, and in behaviors. How this diversity is portrayed is often dictated by the hegemonic culture; the culture that exerts the predominant influence over the populous. This course will explore issues in diversity through the lens of film and pop culture. We will look at how racial, gender, ethnic, social class, age, and disability stereotypes are used, created, and perpetuated through the popular media including film, TV, and advertising.”

 

VUSM-200-002 MWF 10:10am – 11:05am MRC 570 Michael Parker

Living in a Diverse World

This seminar course is designed to increase students’ awareness, understanding, and appreciation of diversity, broadly defined (e.g., diversity in race and ethnicity, social class, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, and religion). Through completion of this course, students will build knowledge and skills involved in being advocates for cultural competency and responsible citizens in our diverse and changing world. Credits: 3; Prerequisite: any 100 level VUSM course.

 

VUSM-200-003 TR 12:30pm – 1:50pm NRC 201 Matthew Bersagel-Braley

Living in a Diverse World

This seminar is designed to increase students' awareness, understanding, and appreciation of diversity, broadly defined (e.g., diversity in race and ethnicity, social class, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, and religion). Students will build skills for becoming responsible citizens and advocates for cultural competency. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 200 level. Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM-200-004 TR 11:00am-12:20pm BRC 206 David Waters

Living in a Diverse World

We will explore the global sports phenomenon of the Modern Olympics, from its re-introduction in 1896 til current Olympiads. The Olympic Movement has as its cornerstone values: respect, excellence, and friendship. Diversity is also ensured with participation of more than 200+ National Olympic Committees from every area of the planet. This course will introduce and analyze the 3 facets of the Olympic Movement: Olympic Games, Olympic Solidarity, and Olympic Academy. The course will offer opportunities to research issues of diversity, inclusiveness, and disparate perspectives pertinent to the Olympic Movement. Some perspectives may encompass: sport governance, politics, culture, history, media, economics, and education.

 

VUSM 226 MWF 9:05am-10:00am MRC 348 Michael Lopez-Kaley

Diversity in Religious Perspectives

One of the great challenges facing our society today is the diversity within this country’s borders, diversity that includes diverse races, religions, persuasions, and worldviews.  The challenge for all of us lies in overcoming the biases and prejudices that are deeply rooted within us.  This course will approach racial, economic, age, sexual orientation, and religious diversity through the lens of the Judeo-Christian tradition.  Facts and fallacies regarding what the religious tradition believes and proclaims about the previous diversities will be explored.  The course will also provide opportunities to model leadership in a diverse culture. This course is approved to co-count as an Integrating Faith and Practice Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM 252-001 TR 9:30am – 10:50am FAC 204 Janet McLean

Women in Theatre

At its best, theatre helps us understand who we are; it can explain, examine, ridicule, or celebrate the human condition.  Gender is a fundamental aspect of personal and social identity. It is a biological, psychological, and cultural category of paramount importance. In addition, gender is often a criterion for social stratification and differing political treatment, as well as a favored symbol for expressing essential values and beliefs. This course examines specific examples of the representation of women on the American stage, focusing on what this dramatic literature says and implies about women. It illuminates ideas about the “nature” of women and the changing perceptions of their roles in both the family and society throughout the last 100 years, while also addressing how these changes impact the role of men in dramatic literature.  This course is approved to co-count as a Literary Analysis Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM 281-001 TR 12:30pm-1:50pm FAC 204 Irene TenEyck

Understanding and Working with Mexicans in the United States

The objective of this course is to learn and respect cultural diversity through the study of the complex relationship between the United States of Mexico and the United States of America. The focus of this course is the present day realities of Mexican people working and living in the US.  The course will offer knowledge, values and skills necessary to understand and work with Mexicans in the US. Students will learn about selected historical, social, cultural, political and economic events that shape the life of today’s Mexicans as well as current policy and political decisions that are impacting Mexican in the US. The skills necessary to communicate with and serve Mexicans with availability of community opportunities to enhance students’ cross-cultural practice experiences.  This course is approved to co-count as a Scientific Reasoning in the Social Sciences Way of Thinking Course.

 

Mission Seminars:  Serving the Common Good

VUSM 300-001 W 5:00pm-8:00pm MRC 418 Melissa Collum

Serving the Common Good

“A new generation must fulfill the obligation of citizenship and bear testimony to its national loyalty. A new generation must rededicate this country to the principles upon which it was founded. A new generation must seize the reigns of leadership. A new generation must focus on solving the common problems and building the better future we all desire. A new generation must answer the critical call to service that beckons us all” (Reich, 235). Together, we will discover a way to find or fine-tune your passion for service

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course. Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM 300-002 T 3:00pm-6:00pm NRC 283 (TBA)

Serving the Common Good

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course.  Prerequisite: any 200-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM 300-003 R 4:30pm-6:30pm BRC 123 Tom Thibodeau

Serving the Common Good

This section is a study of homelessness in America, the most extreme expression of poverty.  This study will include reading research and experiential learning.  Demands of the common good will be explored communally.  This course will also include a service activity during the spring semester break.

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course. Prerequisite: any 200-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM 300-004 M 5:00pm-8:00pm NRC 205 (TBA)

Serving the Common Good

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 300 level. Prerequisite: any 200-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM 300-005 T 4:30pm-6:30pm FAC 204 Matthew Bersagel-Braley, Mary Haupert, Taylor Corbett

Serving the Common Good

This section will include an international service trip to South Africa and participants must also meet all expectations for Viterbo University international study.

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course.  Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement and International Study approval.

 

VUSM 300-006 T 12:30pm-1:50pm MRC 378 Krista S. Clements Orlan

Serving the Common Good

This section will employ a blended course format with approximately 50% of the course activity conducted on-line.

Following in the Franciscan tradition and Viterbo's value of service, this seminar asks students to actively participate in civic engagement and connect course content to those experiences. Students will engage in activities designed to foster the common good while reflecting on their values and practices of community, service, and collaboration. Collaborations with community partners will allow students to demonstrate community engagement and responsibility. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service in the full-semester version of the course.

Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.

 

VUSM-330-001 MWF 12:20pm-1:15pm MRC 414 Jason Howard

Classical Concepts of the Common Good

This course introduces students to the early development of the idea of the common good in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Through their conception of virtue, politics and "the Good," Socrates, Aristotle, Cicero, and Marcus Aurelius provided the foundation for many later Christian notions of the common good. The class will contrast classical conceptions of the common good with later Christian perspectives (Aquinas' idea of Natural Law and recent Catholic social teachings) and at least one contemporary perspective (that of John Rawls). Philosophy for Children uses philosophy to empower children to be respectful, tolerant, and morally responsible. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service. Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.  This course is approved to co-count as a Philosophical and Moral Inquiry Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM-340-001 TR 2:00pm-3:20pm FAC 204 Janet McLean

Serving the Common Good: the Lakota of The Great Plains

This seminar explores the history of the Native nations located in WI, MN, IA, SD and ND.  The nations included are the Anishinaabe (Ojiway/Chippewa), Ho-Chunk (Winnebago), Mamaceqtaw (Menominee), Mesquakie (Sac and Fox), and nations commonly called Sioux, which includes the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota.  The focus will be on learning the unique background of each of these nations, as well as the struggle all Native nations faced in retaining their cultural identity since the Bureau of Indian Affairs was established as a branch of the US War Department in 1824.  The objective of this seminar is to enhance and advance understanding of Native history, culture, and current events.  The students in the class will choose group projects that will complete their service hours after research and guidance from the instructor.  Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service. Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.  This course is approved to co-count as a Historical Analysis Way of Thinking Course.

 

Mission Seminars:  The Ethical Life

VUSM 400-001 TR 11:00am - 12:20pm MRC 500 (TBA)

The Ethical Life

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 400-002 M 3:30pm-6:30pm MRC 414 Melissa Collum

 The Ethical Life

Are you a passenger on the road of life? Passively gazing out the window, listening to tunes on the radio of someone else’s choosing? Or are you the driver? Plotting a clear course only to get stuck in a traffic jam? Better yet, be a hitchhiker – sometimes driving and other times a passenger, yet always in control of your ultimate destiny.

The course shall aid you in setting your moral/ethical compass for life’s journey. Metaphorically "Walk into a bar with Plato and a Platypus" to uncover philosophical/ethical understandings via jokes, wade through the thought provoking account of Wiesenthal’s, The Sunflower, and run from the paradoxical ethical dilemmas into Stangroom’s “Would You Eat Your Cat?” Our journey shall take you to from the depths of your soul to the expanses of the moral universe all the time preparing you to be a hitchhiker in the world of the unknown.  Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level.  Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 400-003 TR 2:00pm-3:20pm MRC 418 (TBA)

The Ethical Life

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 400-005 TR 9:30am-10:50am MRC 436 Robyn Gaier

The Ethical Life

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 400-006 M 6:00pm-9:00pm NRC 195 Richard Kyte, Thomas Thibodeau

The Ethical Life

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 400-007 (TBA) Dorothy Lenard  (15 week On-line)

The Ethical Life

This section will employ a full semester on-line format design for students in traditional undergraduate programs. 

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues. Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement. 

 

VUSM 431-001 T 3:30pm-6:30pm MRC 378 William J. Reese, Christopher J. Rogers

The Ethical Life from the New Testament Gospels

The question "What did Jesus do?" remains the hallmark of the Christian Church's message and identity. "What would Jesus do?" is the major question this course will ask. What are the determined features of the ethical life Jesus modeled and taught? How do the narratives of the four gospels offer people an ethical foundation? How can we understand Jesus' ethics in relation to ideas of truth, consequences, fairness, and character?

Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: Any Serving the Common Good course and any Living in a Diverse World course or transfer student placement.  This course is approved to co-count as an Integrating Faith and Practice Way of Thinking Course.

 

Center for Adult Learning On-line (CAL Only)

VUSM 251-002 Diana Cataldi

Global Music in a Diverse World

Global Music in a Diverse World raises critical consciousness of diverse populations through the exploration of various musical and cultural traditions from around the world. Examples include Indonesia, Puerto Rico, Ghana, Argentina, Jazz, Gospel and other traditions. These cultures will be studied within the broader context of rituals, memory, migration, politics, transmission, identity and life-cycle events. Students will learn through directed reading, listening, online group discussion, giving online presentations and attending live performances. Through this seminar course, students will become advocates for cultural competency and responsible citizens in our diverse and changing world.

Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement. This course is restricted to students in CAL academic programs and is approved to co-count as an Artistic Awareness Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM 325-002 (TBA) John Eyster

The Common Good in the Life of a Christian

The notion of "The common good" originated over two thousand years ago in Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Vatican II defined the "common good" as "the sum of those conditions of social life which allow social groups and their individual members relatively thorough and ready access to their own fulfillment." The common good, then, consists primarily of having the social systems, institutions, and environments on which we all must depend and work in a manner that benefits everyone. This course will examine the environments that establish and enhance the common good. Using philosophical principles, ethical theories, and religious traditions, students will learn the utilitarian aspects of the common good while pursuing a just, compassionate, and virtuous worldview. Students must complete 25 hours or 10 instances of service.

Prerequisite: any 100-level VUSM course or transfer student placement. This course is restricted to students in CAL academic programs and is approved to co-count as an Integrating Faith and Practice Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM 400-001 Melissa Collum

The Ethical Life

The Ethical Life builds upon students' ethical reasoning to examine moral values and explore real world dilemmas. Students will examine virtue ethics, deontological ethics, and utilitarianism. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify and analyze their own ethical values and should be apply to use ethical principles to clarify a range of issues.

Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: any 300-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.  This course is restricted to students in CAL academic programs and is approved to co-count as a Philosophical and Moral Inquiry Way of Thinking Course.

 

VUSM 431-002 TBA

The Ethical Life from the New Testament Gospels

The question "What did Jesus do?" remains the hallmark of the Christian Church's message and identity. "What would Jesus do?" is the major question this course will ask. What are the determined features of the ethical life Jesus modeled and taught? How do the narratives of the four gospels offer people an ethical foundation? How can we understand Jesus' ethics in relation to ideas of truth, consequences, fairness, and character?

Students may not earn credit for more than one VUSM course at the 400 level. Prerequisite: any 300-level VUSM course or transfer student placement.  This course is restricted to students in CAL academic programs and is approved to co-count as a Philosophical and Moral Inquiry Way of Thinking Course.