Independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty member. Refer to the academic policy section for independent study policy. Independent study contract is required. May be repeated for credit.

Courses on topics of interest to sociology students offered on the basis of need, interest, or timeliness. Prerequisite: 125. Restricted to students with junior standing or higher. May be repeated for credit. See registrar's office current class schedules Web page for specific semester description.

Non-classroom experiences in the field of sociology. Placements are off-campus, and may be full- or part-time, and with or without pay. Credit for experiences must be sought prior to occurance, and learning contracts must be submitted before the end of the first week of the semester. See the experiential learning: internship section of this catalog for more details. Restricted to students with senior standing. Graded CR/NC.

Independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty member. Refer to the academic policy section for independent study policy. Independent study contract is required. Prerequisite: 125. May be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to the scientific methods of conducting social research. Students will develop skills in measuring variables, drawing samples, designing data collection instruments, analyzing data, and writing and presenting scholarly reports. Students will also use this knowledge to critically evaluate the research of others. Prerequisite: 125. Restricted to students with junior standing or higher.

Marriage-family complex as a social institution: variations, interrelationship of family to other social institutions, dating, marriage, childraising, divorce, death, and remarriage, contemporary issues in marriage and family life, and future of marriage and family. This course will empower the student to make more informed decisions about marriage and family life choices. SS

This volunteer experience requires a minimum of 30 hours in the community. The human service agency setting is selected by the instructor and the students in the course. Prerequisites: 149, 249. May be repeated for credit. Graded CR/NC.

This course will introduce the major theoretical approaches to the study of criminology and the sociology of deviance. These perspectives are explored through a discussion of contemporary issues such as trends in offending and victimization, research on violent crime, property crime, public order crime, organized crime, and white-collar and corporate crime. Issues of unequal power, social division, and exclusion are also examined (e.g., age, gender, and social class etc.). (Equivalent to CRMJ 351.)

This course provides an introduction to the field of collective behavior. It will examine contemporary and historical social movements, particularly those used to address social injustices. Theoretical perspectives used to explain and predict movements will be examined. Topics may include movements of the 1960s (e.g., Civil Rights, Black Power, American Indian, Women, Gays and Lesbians, etc.), as well as more contemporary movements (e.g., Environmental, the New American Right, Global Justice, etc.)

This course will examine various environmental issues connected with contemporary society. It will address the connections, relationships and interactions between society and the environment. The major theoretical perspectives and methods used by sociologists to understand environmental issues will be explored. It will examine large social structures and organizations and how individuals affect nature and the environment. The impact of globalization on the environment, and its influence on diverse peoples will be discussed.