The capstone course supports students in their transition from academia to generalist social work practice in the agency setting. Course outcomes emphasize the connection between theory and practice. Course content includes organizational theory, ethics in agency settings, supervision, organizational functions and client systems. Information on credentialing, licensure and career development further the students identification as a professional social worker. Must be taken concurrently with 480. Prerequisite: 366 or PSYC 340, MATH 130 or PSYC 223 or SOCL 223.

Courses on topics of interest to social work students offered on the basis of need, interest, or timeliness. Prerequisites as determined by instructor. Restricted to students with junior standing or higher. May be repeated for credit. For specific section description, click to the Section Details in VitNet.

This course focuses on the theory, practice skills, and knowledge needed for social work practice with groups, and communities. Emphasis is on executing the planned change process with multiple system levels in generalist practice. Inclusion and diversity issues are examined in mezzo and macro system change efforts. Theory provides a basis for understanding social issues in communities and groups and underpinning for intervention models. Students examine ethical conflicts in community and group work. Prerequisite: admission to the social work program, 321, 331.

This course prepares students for the field education experience, focusing on the work required to obtain an approved education placement. Content and procedures regarding admission to field education, placement process, and agency interviews are covered, cumulating in an approved field placement. Course content includes an overview of field education, expectations of field education, the field learning contract, and the Senior Capstone course.

In this agency-based practicum students practice with the knowledge, values, and skills developed throughout the social work curricula. Students engage in a structured, individualized, educational experience in a community agency setting. Viterbo University faculty liaisons, agency instructors and students collaborate to facilitate the transition from classroom to generalist social work practice. During the semester student provide social work services 30 hours per week, for a minimum of 450 hours, in an agency setting approved by the Viterbo University social work field director.

Courses on topics of interest to social work students offered on the basis of need, interest, or timeliness. Prerequisites as determined by instructor. Restricted to students with freshman or sophomore standing. May be repeated for credit. For specific section description, click to the Section Details in VitNet.

Independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty member. Refer to the academic policy section for independent study policy. Independent study contract is required. May be repeated for credit.

This course will provide students with knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with individuals and families. Students will develop interviewing and practice skills in relation to working with clients of diverse racial, cultural, class, and religious backgrounds, as well as address social work values and ethics. The planned change process, ethical and purposeful use of self, and use of theory to guide practice will be emphasized. Prerequisites: 280, 331; admission to the social work program.

This course focuses on theory and knowledge of individuals and families including biological, social, psychological, spiritual, and cultural factors that impact human development and behavior. Utilizing the generalist approach to social work practice, a social systems perspective is applied to understand the relationships between individuals, families and the broader social environment. Diversity is presented in its many facets covering ethnicity, culture, race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, age, and disability.

With a focus on inter-professional practice, students will gain an understanding of long living individuals in contemporary society and learn the diverse needs of aging adults and appreciate the issues impacting gerontological practice. Students will gain elder assessment skills and learn tools to screen for spiritual needs, depression, substance abuse, suicide and physical abuse or neglect. Students will learn how to practice in multi-disciplinary teams to serve older adults in a wide range of settings, from hospitals to community centers. Prerequisite: 210 or SOCL 125 or PSYC 171.