English Symposium
Fall 2000, Spring 2001

Grant T. Smith, Ph. D.
Associate Professor of English
MC 536
Phone: 3485
E-mail: gtsmith@viterbo.edu

Course Description:
    The Symposium is organized to proved the English majors and faculty an opportunity to share
    experiences and explore literary/cultural interests.

Course Requirements:
    Beginning with the student's second absence each semester, each unexcused absence
    will result in the reduction of the student's grade by a half letter. (See the Student Handbook for the
    definition of absences.)  Students will be asked to write one two-to-three page response to any of the
    presentations during the fall semester. The students will be asked to write one two-to-three page
    response to any of the presentations during the spring semester, and one two-to-three page response
    to one of the senior theses.  Click here for the senior thesis worksheet.  Click here for last year's
    winning essay.  Click here for the winning thesis in 1999.  Attendance at the annual spring breakfast is
    required and will count as a class session.

Click here for English Department Web Page.
Click here for several hypertexts by noted world authors.
Click here for a helpful "how to study" site that includes documentation tips.
Click herefor a guide to writing research papers.
Click here for one of the best "help list" web sites I've ever seen
Click here for a Viterbo library web site on evaluating internet sources and citing sources.
 

Fall Calendar and Events

September 6
    Introduction of English Faculty and English Majors
    Objectives, Requirements, and Activities for the year
    Club Officers (Elections?)
    English Department Opening Social
    Quiz

September 13
    Lyon Evans, Ph. D., Professor of English
    "Lyon's Great China Adventure"

September 30
    Opening Social at Professor Ruppel's home (see announcements below)

October 18
    Amy Lane from Career Services

October 24
    Poetry Reading featuring Dr. William Stobb
    8 p.m. in the Union

November 2
    Grant T. Smith -- "Who Cares? Teaching With an Ethic of Care in the Classroom"
    Ethics in Leadership Institute, 7:30 p.m., FAC Recital Hall

November 3
    Alumni Social and Job Fair
    Room 502 MC, 3:10 p.m.

November 8
    Building Bridges Presentation
    Susan Rush, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts
    Room 502 MC, 3:10 p.m.

November 15
    Faculty Presentations
    Room 502 MC, 3:10 p.m.

November 29
    Presentation by members of English Education Majors who attended the NCTE Conference in
    Milwaukee
    Room 502 MC, 3:10 p.m.

Fall Announcements:

    Opening Social: September 30, 5 p.m. at Dick and Kathy Ruppel's home, 411 N 22nd Street.
    Bring a dish to pass.

    Poetry Reading by Dr. Willliam Stobb, 8 p.m. in the Union, October 24.

    Young Adult Literature Reading Group (See Professor Smith for details)
        September 14, MC 402, 7-8:30 p.m.  Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
        October 12, MC 402, 7-8:30 p.m.  Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
        November 9, La Crosse Public Library, 7-8:30 p.m., When Zachary Beaver Came to Town
        by Kimberly Willis Holt

    Call for Papers for the 16th Annual National Undergraduate Literature Conference, April 5-7, 2001 at Weber
    State University in Ogden, Utah.  See Grant T. Smith for details.
 
 

Spring Calendar and Events

Course Requirements:

Beginning with the student's second absence each semester, each unexcused absence will result in the reduction of the student's grade by a half letter. (See the Student Handbook for the definition of absences.) Attendance at the annual spring breakfast is required and will count as a class session.The required text the second semester is What Is English? by Peter Elbow.  All students should have a copy of the text.  It is available at the college bookstore.  Each student should respond to one of the discussion questions during the three weeks we discuss What Is English?  All 327 students and every 427 student who is not writing a thesis, should read and respond to one of the seven senior theses.  These senior projects will be placed on the web, and hard copies will also be placed on reserve in the library.  Click here for the senior thesis worksheet.  Click here for last year's winning essay.  Click here for the winning thesis in 1999.  All 127 and 227 students should read and respond to two of the seven abstracts of senior theses.  The abstracts will be on reserve at the circulation desk in the library.

Spring Class Meetings (Mandatory):

Wednesday, January 17
        Introductions and Announcements
        Assignments:  Position Paper, "What can we do to make the English Department stronger?"
                             Read Chapters One through Four of What Is English?
                         Click here for a good web site on Peter Elbow with several helpful links to become a
                             a better writer.
                             Click here for a vocabulary list from What Is English?
                             Click here for a list of the discussion questions for Chapters One through Four
                             of What Is English?

Wednesday, January 24
     Discussion of Chapters One through Four of What Is English?
     Assignments:  Read Chapters Five through Eight of What Is English?  Click here for the
        discussion questions on these chapters.

Wednesday, January 31
        Discussion of Chapters Five through Eight of What Is English?
        Assignments:  Read Chapters Nine through Twelve of What Is English?
        Click here for the discussion questions for these chapters.

Wednesday, February 7
        Discussion of Chapters Nine through Twelve of What Is English?
        All essays on What Is English? are due.
        Concluding thoughts on Peter Elbow

Tuesday, February 13
        Visiting poet, Claudia Keelan, reads from her award-winning volume Utopic. 7 p.m. at the FAC
       Recital Hall.  Afternoon discussion, 3:30 p.m. in MC 420.  (Attendance optional)

Tuesday, March 20
    Open Microphone Poetry Reading
    Rober's Conference Room
    7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 11
           Alternate Class Session:  Graduate School at Winona State University

Wednesday, April 18
        Defense of Senior Theses
          Click here to read Hillary Laurent's senior thesis: "A Woman with Wings: Female
        Individuation in Terry Tempest Williams's Refuge"
        Click here to read Susan Lundquist's senior thesis: "Living at Home: Female
        Empowerment in Uncle Tom's Cabin"
          Room change to MC 408

Wednesday, April 25
        Defense of Senior Theses
          Click here to read Carney Lentz's senior thesis: "The Golden Calf" and Three Other Food Stories
          Click here to read Sue Fisher's senior thesis: "Fortune Favors the Available Man: Corruption of the
          American Dream in The House Behind the Cedars.
        Room change to MC 408

Friday, April 27
        Jacqueline Woodson
        FAC Recital Hall, 7 p.m.

Wednesday, May 2
        Defense of Senior Theses
          Click here to read Darcie Vacek's senior thesis: "I Got a Tree on My Back and a Hant in My
          House: The Influence of Dwelling on Being in Toni Morrison's Beloved."
          Click here to read Eric Slette's senior thesis: "John Walden: American Dreamer"
          Click here to read Chris Linton's senior thesis: "Tackling the Tough Issues in Middle
          and High School English Classes"
          Room change to MC 408
        All essays on Senior Theses are due.

Monday, May 7
        English Department Breakfast and Awards, 8 a.m.

Spring Announcements and Alternative Attendance and Writing Opportunities