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D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership

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Research Fellow 2008–09

Debra Daehn Zellmer

Debra Daehn ZellmerProfessor/Chair
Social Work Department
ddzellmer@viterbo.edu
608-796-3728

Daehn Zellmer is a professor and undergraduate social work program director at Viterbo University where she teaches Social Welfare Policy, Introduction to Social Work, Senior Capstone, and social work electives. She has a master's degree in social work from the University of Iowa and a Bachelor of Science in Social Work from Augsburg College. She has 18 years' experience in social work education. Prior to teaching, Daehn Zellmer practiced social work for 15 years with families and children in the areas of school social work, parent education, family therapy, foster care, and adoption. Her current research includes issues related to gatekeeping in social work education and spirituality and religion in social work practice.

Publications 

  • Daehn Zellmer, D.A. & Knothe, T.E. (2011). The use of criminal background checks in social work education. The Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work Education, 16, 17–33.
  • Zellmer, D.D. & Anderson-Meger, J.I. (2011). Rural Midwestern religious beliefs and help seeking behavior: Implications for social work practice.  Social Work & Christianity, 38, 27–50.
  • Zellmer, D.D. & Anderson-Meger, J.I. (2009). Rural Midwestern religious beliefs and help seeking behavior: Implications for social work practice. Proceedings of the 34th Rural Social Work Conference. Retrieved from  http://www.ruralsocialwork.org/whats_new_index.cfm.
  • Zellmer, D.D. (2003). Teaching to prevent burnout. Journal of Analytic Teaching, 24, 19–22.

Speaking Topics

  • “Rural Midwestern Religious Values and Help-Seeking Behaviors”
  • “Preventing Burnout in Helping Professionals”
  • “Professional Gatekeeping: Can Convicted Criminals be Professional Helpers?”